Memorial Stadium
Memorial Stadium is the Harlandale Indians' home field. It is located on Roosevelt Avenue, between S.W. Military Drive and Loop 410. It was built in 1968 and was dedicated "in honor of all the students of  Harlandale Independent School District who have lost their lives in the service of their country." Below is a list of the names that grace the monument in front of our home field:

* read his story below
Freeman  A. Allen Guadalupe U.  Lara* Charles R.  Rawlings
David Anthony, Jr. Allen Lawhon Emil Real, Jr.
Frank Baldwin Ray C. Laza Augustine Resendez*
Frank Balmos Glenn Leach Clifton Roberts
Morris Bell Armando Leal, Jr. * Hollie W. Roberts
William Bordelon* Eddie LeBlanc James L. Robinson, Jr.
Stewart Britton Milton Lee * Manuel Romero*
Floyd W.  Buchi Howard Loveland C.L. Ryan
Stanley Clark* John M. Luther Robert H.  Sanchez*
Bruce  T. Conady Harold Macha John  F. Scoggins
Dwight C. Coy, Jr.* Armando  Martinez* Joe William Serna
Hamilton D. Currier, Jr Juan A. Martinez* Joseph A.  Smith
Kenneth  Dial Walter Mayer* Donald St. Pierre
Virgil Dickey* Johnny McCollum* Fred M. Stockert, Jr
Bernard P. Duffin* David Cotter McDaniel* Steven Talamantez*
Anthony Edwards* Pat McDonough Eugene Tardy
Martin Essary, Jr. * Lonnie O. Morris Joaquin Tello*
Eugene Evans* Manuel O'Canas Edwin H. Thedford
Manuel Fernandez, Jr.* Guadalupe P. Ochoa* Russell Lee Thompson
Quinton Forrester Pete  Ortiz Billy J. Thornblom *
Jose G. Garcia* Marcelo Ortiz, Jr.* Stephen W.  Tucker
Charles O. Graves Clarance Outterside James Sidney Vance*
Paul Gray Porfirio Ovalle, Jr.* Eliseo Villalobos*
Harold.W. Hatley* Leslie Pack George M.  Vineyard*
Kimmey D. Hobbs* Wilton Padier, Jr.* Lyan Watkins
Elbert A.  Holt, Jr. Jack Parker Charles E.  Weaver*
George Hunt* Johnny Parker Ray Allen Weaver
Fred Johnson Roger Pena, Jr. Ted Weil
James M. Jonas Michael L. Pfeuffer Warren Wiggins
Cecil Franklin Jordan* Robert L. Ragsdale (HHS '57)* Vernon Witten
Harrell Langford Florencio Ramirez* Norma Sanchez Yaeger
  Gene Ramirez* Carl E. Young
     
And when it's done, and we have won, 
all the glory will be yours, 
Maroon and Gold!

-Harlandale HS Alma Mater

Readers,

I would love to have more than just the names of these heroes on our website. If you have a story to tell about one of these men or women who gave his/her life for us, PLEASE send it to me. The story can be any type of reminiscence; serious, funny, poignant, etc. It can be a story from a classmate, teacher, friend, or family member. My goal is to "put a face" on the names that grace our Memorial Stadium monument. Several of our alumni have been officially recognized for their heroism, but all of them are heroes and they deserve to be remembered. You may use the email link below to submit your story. Your contributions will greatly enhance this page.


The following is the full text citation for the Congressional Medal of Honor awarded to William James Bordelon:

BORDELON, WILLIAM JAMES 

Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 25 December 1920, San Antonio, Tex. Accredited to: Texas. Citation: For valorous and gallant conduct above and beyond the call of duty as a member of an assault engineer platoon of the 1st Battalion, 18th Marines, tactically attached to the 2d Marine Division, in action against the Japanese-held atoll of Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands on 20 November 1943. Landing in the assault waves under withering enemy fire which killed all but 4 of the men in his tractor, S/Sgt. Bordelon hurriedly made demolition charges and personally put 2 pillboxes out of action. Hit by enemy machinegun fire just as a charge exploded in his hand while assaulting a third position, he courageously remained in action and, although out of demolition, provided himself with a rifle and furnished fire coverage for a group of men scaling the seawall. Disregarding his own serious condition, he unhesitatingly went to the aid of one of his demolition men, wounded and calling for help in the water, rescuing this man and another who had been hit by enemy fire while attempting to make the rescue. Still refusing first aid for himself, he again made up demolition charges and single-handedly assaulted a fourth
Japanese machinegun position but was instantly killed when caught in a final burst of fire from the enemy. S/Sgt. Bordelon's great personal valor during a critical phase of securing the limited beachhead was a contributing factor in the ultimate occupation of the island, and his heroic determination throughout 3 days of violent battle reflects the highest credit upon the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country. 




 

STANLEY A. CLARK Captain, U.S. Army Air Forces; 349th Bomber Squadron, 100th Bomber Group, Heavy; Entered the Service from: Texas; Died: November 7, 1944; Buried at: Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England; Awards: Distinguished Flying Cross with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters, Air Medal with 5 Oak Leaf Clusters.




DWIGHT CLIFFORD COY JR was born on August 19, 1946 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 3516 in the Marines.  In 2 years of service, he attained the rank of SGT/E5. He began a tour of duty on September 30, 1967. On August 26, 1968, at the age of 22, DWIGHT CLIFFORD COY JR perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Tri.

Learn more about Dwight C. Coy



VIRGIL W. DICKEY, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army Air Forces; 34th Pursuit Squadron, 24th Pursuit Group; Entered the Service from: Texas; Died: December 26, 1941; Missing in Action or Buried at Sea; Awards: Purple Heart 

Submitted by Jim Brock: Virgil was a member of the 34th Pursuit Squadron and a fellow squadron member of my dad, James Byron Brock of Taft, Texas. Dad left some good records of what happen to most of the guys, but I suspect that Virgil was one of the guys that had survived the Bataan Death March but died a few months later in one of the Japanese POW camps.




 BERNARD P. DUFFIN, Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Forces; 305th Squadron, 442nd Troop Carrier Group; Entered the Service from: Texas; Died: November 30, 1944; Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery, Henri-Chapelle, Belgium.




ANTHONY JOHN EDWARDS was born on February 25, 1947 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 11B10 in the Army.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of PVT/E2. He began a tour of duty on October 8, 1967. On August 4, 1968, at the age of 21, ANTHONY JOHN EDWARDS perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Kontum.



 MARTIN WILLIAM ESSARY JR was born on September 13, 1942 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX.

He served as a 11B40 in the Army. In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of SGT/E5. On October 20, 1969, at the age of 27, MARTIN WILLIAM ESSARY JR perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Phuoc Long. 

Learn more about Martin W. Essary Jr. 




 
EUGENE B. EVANS, Private, U.S. Army, 130th Infantry Regiment, 33rd Infantry Division; Died: February 24, 1945; Buried at: Manila American Cemetery, Manila, Philippines; Awards: Purple Heart.
Submitted by Christine Waters (neice): Thank you for honoring my uncle, Eugene B. Evans, for his service in World War II.  He was very proud, as many were, to defend his country.  After serving in New Guinea, he was killed in Luzon by a sniper's bullet on Feb. 24th 1945. 

My mother, Eileen Evans, was also a graduate of Harlandale High School and was one of the first WAC's to serve in WWII at Ft. Sam Houston and Camp Pickett, Virginia. 



 MANUEL FERNANDEZ JR., Master Sergeant, U.S. Army Air Forces, 878th Bomber Squadron, 499th Bomber Group, Very Heavy; Entered the Service from: Texas; Died: March 25, 1945; Buried at: Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii; Awards: Air Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Purple Heart




JOSE GILBERTO GARCIA was born on December 11, 1946 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 0311 in the Marines.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of CPL/E4. He began a tour of duty on September 24, 1967. On July 5, 1968, at the age of 21, JOSE GILBERTO GARCIA perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Tri. 

Learn more about Jose G. Garcia



PAUL HOUSTON GRAY was born on March 18, 1949 and joined the Armed Forces while in SERGEANT BLUFF, IOWA.

He served as a 0331 in the Marine Corps.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of PFC/E2. On February 24, 1967, at the age of 18, PAUL HOUSTON GRAY perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Ngai.

Submitted by Richard Adams: Paul Gray served as a student manager for the football and basketball teams during his sophomore year at Harlandale.  At the time he was about five feet two or so, and he may have weighed 100 pounds.  I think he would have played if he had been given the size to do so.  I remember his running on the field during timeout with water and towels.  He was not called Paul at school, he was called Spike. He was just as much a part of Indian athletics as the people who played the games.




HAROLD W. HATLEY was born in 1927

Private First Class, U.S. Army; Killed in Action; Died March 11, 1951 in Korea; Private First Class Hatley was a member of the 32nd Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in South Korea on March 11, 1951. Private First Class Hatley was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously. 




KIMMEY DEAN HOBBS was born on June 7, 1947 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 91B20 in the Army.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of SP4/E4. He began a tour of duty on November 3, 1967. On April 10, 1968, at the age of 20, KIMMEY DEAN HOBBS perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Tin

Submitted by Michael Colicchio: Kimmey "Doc" Hobbs was the Medic assigned to my platoon and vehicle, C-26. Doc, we never called him Kimmey, was a kind, caring and dedicated medic, who, like all combat medics, was worth his weight in gold. "Doc" would feverishly work to save the lives of the wounded; all wounded. He tried to save every life with which he came into contact; American or enemy. "Doc", you deserved better. I wish to extend my condolences to Kimmey's family and friends, and to let them know that, as the sole survivor of the incident that took his life, I, too, mourn Kimmey's death, daily. Please take consolation in the fact that he was loved and respected, and died honorably in the service of his country. 




GEORGE JAMES HUNT, Seaman, Second Class, U.S. Navy; Entered the Service from: Texas; Died: November 27, 1942; Honolulu Memorial, Honolulu, Hawaii 




CECIL F. JORDAN, Born 1916; First Lieutenant, U.S. Army; Killed in Action; Died February 5, 1952 in Korea; First Lieutenant Jordan was a member of the 223rd Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in North Korea on February 5, 1952. 




Guadalupe U. Lara, Private, U.S. Army; 975th Field Artillery Battalion; Entered the Service from: Texas; Died: March 2, 1945; Epinal American Cemetery, Epinal, France; Awards: Purple Heart 



Submitted by Rose Mary Perez: I was a friend of Armando Leal. We went to Southcross Jr. High School together.  He was such a funny person. He always made us laugh. He was always learning new words and trying to impress us with them. I remember walking with him on field days. We always talked a lot and laughed a lot. I don't remember him ever being mad or unhappy. He was a happy person and the goodness shined in his eyes.  We went to  to high school together, and he was always a good friend.  I remember  when Armando joined the Navy. He was so proud  to be in the service of our country. He went around to all his friends, and told  us "bye" before he left for Vietnam.   Labor Day was always a sad day for me,  because he died on Labor Day.   We have all grown older, but I always remember Armando with his red hair, his freckles and that wonderful smile of his.  Armando, you were the best friend of my youth.

The following is the full text citation for the Navy Cross awarded to Armando Leal:

For extraordinary heroism on 4 September 1967 while serving as corpsman with the Second Platoon, Company "M", Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Marine Division (Reinforced), FMF, in connection with operations against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Vietnam.  During Operation SWIFT, the Second Platoon was providing security for the Battalion Command Group when the platoon came under heavy enemy fire.  Petty Officer (then Hospitalman) Leal ran through the fire-swept area, and began administering first aid to several casualties who were directly exposed to grazing fire.  Although constantly exposed to heavy fire, and painfully wounded himself, he rendered aid for two hours to wounded Marines who were located between friendly and enemy lines.  He refused to be evacuated in order that he might continue his mission of mercy.  While treating his comrades and moving them to protected areas, Petty Officer Leal was severely wounded for a second time and, despite being immobilized, calmly continued to aid his wounded comrades.  A Marine tried to drag him to a covered position, but was shot in the hand and, at that time, Petty Officer Leal received a third wound. Petty Officer Leal pushed the Marine and told him to take cover from the assaulting enemy whom they both could see.  Suddenly a North Vietnamese soldier fired a machine gun from close range, mortally wounding Petty Officer Leal.  Through his swift actions and professional skill in aiding and protecting the wounded, he significantly eased the suffering and undoubtedly saved the lives of several of his comrades.  His exceptional courage and unfaltering dedication to duty in the face of great personal risk were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.



The following is the full text citation for the Congressional Medal of Honor awarded to Milton Lee:
*LEE, MILTON A. 

Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Company B, 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). place and date: Near Phu Bai, Thua Thien province, Republic of Vietnam, 26 April 1968. Entered service at: San Antonio, Tex. Born: 28 February 1949, Shreveport, La. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Pfc. Lee distinguished himself near the city of Phu Bai in the province of Thua Thien. Pfc. Lee was serving as the radio telephone operator with the 3d platoon, Company B. As lead element for the company, the 3d platoon received intense surprise hostile fire from a force of North Vietnamese Army regulars in well-concealed bunkers. With 50 percent casualties, the platoon maneuvered to a position of cover to treat their wounded and reorganize, while Pfc. Lee moved through the heavy enemy fire giving lifesaving first aid to his wounded comrades. During the subsequent assault on the enemy defensive positions, Pfc. Lee continuously kept close radio contact with the company commander, relaying precise and understandable orders to his platoon leader. While advancing with the front rank toward the objective, Pfc. Lee observed 4 North Vietnamese soldiers with automatic weapons and a rocket launcher Lying in wait for the lead element of the platoon. As the element moved forward, unaware of the concealed danger, Pfc. Lee immediately and with utter disregard for his own personal safety, passed his radio to another soldier and charged through the murderous fire. Without hesitation he continued his assault, overrunning the enemy position, killing all occupants and capturing 4 automatic weapons and a rocket launcher. Pfc. Lee continued his 1-man assault on the second position through a heavy barrage of enemy automatic weapons fire. Grievously wounded, he continued to press the attack, crawling forward into a firing position and delivering accurate covering fire to enable his platoon to maneuver and destroy the position. Not until the position was overrun did Pfc. Lee falter in his steady volume of fire and succumb to his wounds. Pfc. Lee's heroic actions saved the lives of the lead element and were instrumental in the destruction of the key position of the enemy defense. Pfc. Lee's gallantry at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, the 502d Infantry, and the U.S. Army. 

Learn more about Milton Lee



ARMANDO DANIEL MARTINEZ was born on August 29, 1947 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 72C20 in the Army.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of PFC/E3. He began a tour of duty on June 30, 1968. On July 31, 1968, at the age of 20, ARMANDO DANIEL MARTINEZ perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Gia Dinh. 



Juan Andres Martinez
JOHN ANDREW MARTINEZ was born on April 26, 1948 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 11B2P in the Army.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of SP4/E4. He began a tour of duty on January 13, 1968. On May 6, 1968, at the age of 20, JOHN ANDREW MARTINEZ perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Thua Thien. 




WALTER CHRISTIAN MAYER was born on August 17, 1947 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 11B1P in the Army.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of PFC/E3. He began a tour of duty on April 6, 1967. On June 22, 1967, at the age of 19, WALTER CHRISTIAN MAYER perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Kontum. 



 

Submitted by Bill Allen, Historian, 67th Network Warfare Wing: Capt McCollum was in the 45th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, flying the RF-51D photo reconnaissance version of the Mustang.  He crash-landed his aircraft north of Karo-ri, Korea, while on a photo mission.  He was killed in action and his remains were later recovered.  His squadron is still active at Offutt AFB, NE as the 45th Reconnaissance Squadron. The Wing he served under during the Korean War is currently the 67th Network Warfare Wing at Kelly Field Annex, Lackland AFB, Texas.

JOHN J MCCOLLUM was born on April 20, 1923.

He served in the Air Force and attained the rank of CAPT/O3. On April 10, 1951, at the age of 27, JOHN J MCCOLLUM was declared MIA in an unknown location in Korea.




 

Submitted by Steven L. McDaniel:  During the Korean Conflict, DAVID COTTER MCDANIEL was awarded the Silver Star and three Distinguished Flying Crosses, the British Military Cross and five Air Medals.  After the war he was promoted to Major, but became grounded because the streph throat he'd contracted during the war developed into rheumatic heart fever, which finally killed him with a stroke in 1969.  He had a long, successful marriage with his Harlandale sweetheart, Elizabeth Logan (valedictorian class of '41 or '42), and they had five children.  Prior to his death, he had earned his Ph.D. and was an instructor of Aerospace Management to senior-ranking Air Force officers in bases throughout Europe and the Far East.

My father was raised by his grandparents, and was known in high school as David Cotter (their last name).  Would you mind changing his name on the listing to David Cotter McDaniel.

Award of the Silver Star: Captain David C. McDaniel, United States Air Force, distinguished himself by gallantry in action against the enemy on 10 October 1950 by rescuing in a helicopter an injured British Fighter pilot from his downed aircraft, deep in enemy territory north of Seoul, Korea. Landing under small arms fire with complete disregard for his own life and the vulnerability of his aircraft, Captain McDaniel kept the helicopter running, ready for immediate takeoff. The downed pilot, injured and unable to free himself, was pulled out of the wreckage by the para-doctor crew member. Captain McDaniel, upon noting the difficulty the para-doctor was experiencing, left his aircraft, and heedless of enemy fire directed at him, rushed to the injured man's aid. Still under fire, Captain McDaniel and the para-doctor placed the critically injured pilot aboard the helicopter and flew him out of enemy territory to a hospital at Inchon. The courageous action and devotion to duty displayed by Captain McDaniel are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force. 




LUPE P OCHOA was born on November 25, 1946 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 11B20 in the Army.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of SP4/E4. He began a tour of duty on January 4, 1968. On August 24, 1968, at the age of 21, LUPE P OCHOA perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Dinh Tuong. 



MARCELO ORTIZ JR was born on September 25, 1947 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN
ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 2311 in the Marines.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of CPL/E4. He began a tour of duty on August 21, 1967. On April 19, 1968, at the age of 20, MARCELO ORTIZ JR perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Thua Thien. 



PORFIRIO M OVALLE JR was born on July 14, 1949 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 0311 in the Marines.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of PFC/E2. He began a tour of duty on December 10, 1968. On February 25, 1969, at the age of 19, PORFIRIO M OVALLE JR perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Tri. 



WILTON PADIER JR was born on October 21, 1948 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 11D20 in the Army.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of SP5/E5. He began a tour of duty on December 14, 1968. On November 25, 1969, at the age of 21, WILTON PADIER JR perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Kien Giang. 



 

ROGER P. PENA JR. was born on October 28, 1976 and joined the Army while in SAN ANTONIO, TX.

He received basic training at Fort Leonardwood, Missouri, trained at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, TX to become a combat medic, and was stationed at Fort Drum, New York. He was in the 10th Mountain Light Infantry Division and attained the rank of SGT/E5.

Sgt. Roger Pena Jr. was killed in action on June 13, 2006 in Musa Qala, Afghanistan.

 

 


Robert RagsdaleROBERT LOUIS RAGSDALE was born on May 25, 1939 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN
ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 1981 in the Army.  In 1 year of  service, he attained the rank of 2LT/O1. On June 26, 1964, at the age of 25, ROBERT LOUIS RAGSDALE perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Pr & Mr Unknown. 

Submitted by Helen Chernosky Widner: I no longer remember the year, and some details have gotten fuzzy in my memory.  But, what stands out in my memory was hearing the radio broadcast when I got up to go to work. I could not believe that Bobby had been killed in action.  Then, when I attended his funeral, I had never seen such a long line of cars for a funeral procession. I remember looking back and seeing cars with headlights on as far back as I could see -- and looking forward to the beginning of the line and I couldn't even see it. More than likely, I will NEVER forget the graveside grief of his family. Bobby's funeral was what brought "war" home to me.  I have never visited the Harlandale War Memorial, but I'm sure I would shed tears when seeing Bobby's name. And, I'm sure that others who lost loved ones and friends feel the same way. May God bless our service men and women.

From his daughter, Robin Louise Ragsdale Gassen: I grew up not knowing my father. He was killed in action when I was 2 years old and my mother was pregnant with my sister, Ellen. I have been able to learn what kind of man he was through letters he wrote while away. He was a very loving, kind, and selfless man who missed his family very much and was counting the days till he could return.
He often had to notify other platoon mates' families of their loss and hated being the bearer of this type of news. I appreciate all those involved with the news of his death and their compassion and thoughtfulness in bringing that news home to my mothe r and grandparents.
I still have all of his letters and my sister has his medals. My father was one of the first casualties from San Antonio and received honor at his death. I admire all the men who served and lost their lives in this war!

On February 1, 2006 the 63rd Aviation Group, The Udairi Army Airfield Command Cell and the KBR Airfield Management Team dedicated a training site in the Memory of 2LT Robert L. Ragsdale in honor of his service to his country in Vietnam.

www.virtualwall.org/dr/RagsdaleRL01a.htm
 

Learn more about Robert L. Ragsdale



FLORENCIO RAMIREZ JR was born on April 15, 1950 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN
ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 0351 in the Marines.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of PFC/E2. He began a tour of duty on September 8, 1969. On September 16, 1969, at the age of 19, FLORENCIO RAMIREZ JR perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Nam. 

Submitted by Joe L. Reyna: I attended high school with Florencio Ramirez for a brief period. “Flo” is what everyone used to call him. Florencio was a quiet individual who kept to himself. We both had an electrical trades class together and I will never forget the time he stood up for me in a fight with some rough students in shop class. He was willing to side with me and my friends against these other classmates that were not too friendly. I will never forget Flo. Flo dropped out of high school and joined the Marines in our junior year. It was in my senior year that we heard he had been killed in Vietnam, and I was saddened deeply. Especially not knowing how he was killed.  It was not until four or five years ago that I was able to find out how he was killed. I will never forget Florencio, he was a good man and I am sure he was an outstanding Marine, May God Bless him in his eternal sleep.  I eventually enlisted in the Corps upon graduation.


GENE RAMIREZ 28, of San Antonio, Texas.

Ramirez died as a result of enemy action in Al Anbar Province, Iraq. He was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Pendleton, California. Died on November 10, 2004.




AUGUSTINE RESENDEZ was born on May 17, 1946 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN
ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 2511 in the Marines.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of LCPL/E3. On April 27, 1967, at the age of 20, AUGUSTINE RESENDEZ perished in the serviceof our country in South Vietnam, Quang Tri.



MANUEL VILLAREAL ROMERO was born on April 16, 1949 and joined the Armed Forces while in
SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 0311 in the Marines.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of LCPL/E3. He began a tour of duty on December 1, 1967. On April 6, 1968, at the age of 18, MANUEL VILLAREAL ROMERO perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Tri.

Learn more about Manuel V. Romero



ROBERT HUERTA SANCHEZ was born on June 20, 1947 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 11B20 in the Army.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of SGT/E4. He began a tour of duty on December 5, 1967. On October 12, 1968, at the age of 21, ROBERT HUERTA SANCHEZ perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Ngai. 



STEVEN TALAMANTEZ was born on April 5, 1977 and joined the Armed Forces while in LAREDO, TX

He served with the 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas. On July 10, 2011, STEVEN TALAMANTEZ  died in Al Amarah, Iraq, of injuries suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with indirect fire. 


JOAQUIN RODRIGUEZ TELLO was born on March 13, 1948 and joined the Armed Forces while in
SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 11B20 in the Army.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of SP4/E4. He began a tour of duty on September 4, 1968. On May 31, 1969, at the age of 21, JOAQUIN RODRIGUEZ TELLO perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Kontum. 



Billy ThornblumBILLY J. THORNBLOM was born in San Saba, Texas on January 4, 1923 and died April 24, 1945 as a result of burns suffered after his plane crashed in France.  He was a SGT in the 597th Bomb Squad, 397th Bomb GP, AAF.  Originally interred in France, his body was brought back to the United States in 1948 and he is now buried at Ft. Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas.

Billy Joe was the youngest boy in a family of six children.  His four brothers also served in the service during World War II.  The Thornblom boys represented all branches of the military.

 



JAMES SIDNEY VANCE was born on February 1, 1951 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 0311 in the Marines.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of CPL/E4. He began a tour of duty on May 18, 1969. On January 4, 1970, at the age of 18, JAMES SIDNEY VANCE perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Nam. 

Submitted by James Vance's one-time fiance (pictured above): Jim was my fiancé. It was our plan to be married on September 17, 1970. He will always live in my heart. Jim was the only son and eldest child of three children of Dorothy and George Vance, and beloved only grandson of Opal Mills. Jim was born in Gatesville, Texas and his family moved to San Antonio when he was young. Jim's mother died when Jim was 14. When Jim was 16, he signed up to join the Marine Corps and was inducted on his 17th birthday. He was at MCRD San Diego and then transferred to Camp Pendleton, California, where I met him. He was at Camp Pendleton from April, 1968 until May, 1969 when he shipped out for Vietnam. He first served with Third Marine Division and was transferred to First Marine Division in October, 1969. Jim was initially a fire team leader, then a squad leader. In his letters home, he wrote movingly several times of the men who served with him and the sharing they did with each other. Jim will forever live in my heart and will always be remembered for his kindness, generosity, loving devotion to family and friends, sensitivity, courage, sense of honor and fairness, and his wonderful sense of humor. I am a better person for having known and loved him. 



ELISEO MORALES VILLALOBOS was born on April 15, 1942 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 6342 in the Marines.  In 8 years of service, he attained the rank of SGT/E5. He began a tour of duty on January 21, 1969. On April 20, 1969, at the age of 27, ELISEO MORALES VILLALOBOS perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Nam.

Thank you for taking the time to prepare this section.  For many of us who have loved ones named on the memorial  we are reminded everyday of our loss.  My brother died over 30 years ago, and I still remember him taking me to my first Harlandale Indians football game in the fall of 1961. The game was played at the high school, and I had never seen anything like it before.  I don't remember the team they played or what the final score was, but I will always remember walking hand in hand with my big brother.

Submitted by R. San Miguel: In 1968-69 I was in the Marine Corps stationed at Marble Mountain MAG-16, South Vietnam. I was a door gunner on different helicopters and was also with Zulu company perimeter guard and patrols there. I met Eliseo Villalobos in Jan-1969 and found out we were from the same neighborhood. He was older and went to Harlandale with my two older sisters. He told me he married a girl whose maiden name was the same as mine, no relation. We used to hang out and drink beer and talk about San Antonio. I remember him as quiet, a family man and a good guy. I left Vietnam in 3-1969. I found out later in the 70's that he had been killed in a rocket attack on 4-1960. Rest in peace bro. Semper Fi.



GEORGE MICKEL VINEYARD was born on November 1, 1945 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 11B10 in the Army.  In 1 year of service, he attained the rank of PFC/E3. He began a tour of duty on May 10, 1967. On October 23, 1967, at the age of 21, GEORGE MICKEL VINEYARD perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Quang Tin. 

Submitted by R. San Miguel: I am a 1964 grad of McCollum. I knew George Vinyard since we went to Rayburn Elementary, then to Terrell Wells (Terrible Smells) then finally McCollum. I remember him as a nice guy who'd never hurt a flea...easy to talk to and easy to get along with.





CHARLES EDWARD WEAVER was born on December 24, 1934 and joined the Armed Forces while in SAN ANTONIO, TX. 

He served as a 0210 in the Army.  In 8 years of service, he attained the rank of MAJ/O4. He began a tour of duty on September 21, 1967. On November 9, 1967, at the age of 32, CHARLES EDWARD WEAVER perished in the service of our country in South Vietnam, Pr & Mr Unknown. 
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